A Chalet-Style Big Sky Retreat with Resort-Like Amenities

Details

Mountain Neutral Doorway with Spa View

A doorway peeks into the spa. The generous spa—complete with a massage room, separate dry sauna and steam room—and a waterfall feature provide respite after winter sports or golf.

Mountain Neutral Sitting Area with Spa Access

Custom-designed for the owners as a place to relax after outdoor activities, the ample spa is soothing and tranquil. The Bright Chair swivel lounge chair is from Phoebe Marsh in Denver, and the custom-built console forms a niche for Aondrea Maynard’s encaustic from John Brooks.

Mountain Neutral Spa with Heated Loungers

Bradford Products’ heated loungers are a highlight in the spa, which has a massage room, dry sauna and steam room. The Porta Romana light fixture is from John Brooks. Small openings in the floor’s tilework reveal a stream below.

Mountain Neutral Bedroom with Nickel Tub

An ode to the owners’ dual aesthetics, the William Holland tub features rustic nickel and elegant enamel. Hand-molded tiles and Pierre Frey draperies form the backdrop. The glass bell jar light fixture, by Reborn Antiques, is from Kneedler Fauchère.

Mountain Neutral Bedroom with Hair-on-Hide Headboard

Offering a cozy vignette, a guest bedroom boasts a headboard wall made of custom Kyle Bunting hair-on-hide tiles from John Brooks behind the bed, which is fitted with a custom duvet from Jennifer West made with Zimmer + Rohde fabric. The Objet Insolite sconces are from Dean-Warren in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Mountain Neutral Kitchen with Custom Plaster Hood

Kitchen details include white hand-molded tiles, horn hardware from Ochre and counters from Slabworks of Montana. The custom hood design incorporates plaster with hewn timber and corbels. Custom pendants suspend above the island, which is embellished with Rocky Mountain Hardware pulls.

Mountain Neutral Dining Room with Ceramic Antler Chandelier

Placed against a fireplace clad in indigenous, stacked stone, the dining area features a custom table paired with Gregorius Pineo chairs from Kneedler Fauchère set over a Tufenkian rug from the Artisan Rug Gallery. The glossy white ceramic antler fixture by Jason Miller for Roll & Hill adds contrast.

Mountain Neutral Family Room with Club Chairs

In the family room, a Ralph Lauren Home sofa from Town in Denver wears fabrics by GH Leathers and Great Plains. Jean de Merry club chairs from John Brooks, and the coffee table from Our Boat House in Vero Beach, Florida, rest on a rug from Artisan Rug Gallery in Bozeman.

Mountain Neutral Entry with Lodgepole Pines

The home’s covered entry features several formidable lodgepole pines atop specially sourced moss rock boulders acquired in Montana. The custom front door comprises reclaimed-oak planks with hammered-iron straps and custom hardware; it was crafted by T G Works in Bozeman, Montana.

Mountain Neutral Hall with Wood Sculptures

While materials are rooted in tradition, they were tweaked to add a more modern feel. In sections of the home, such as the great room, ample windows are set inside lodgepole pine beams—many of which are wrapped around structural steel I-beams; this enabled the team to incorporate glass planes that added depth and a layering of views.

Mountain Neutral Hall with Horse Painting

Log walls and beamed ceiling structures, as well as locally quarried sandstone flooring, create contrast against plaster finishes, while reclaimed white oak was used for everything from flooring and wall paneling to cabinetry and door packages, and details like hand-hewn fireplace mantels.

Mountain Neutral Bedroom with Stone Fireplace

The master bedroom includes a custom duvet cover by John Tate Workroom in Bozeman, using Castel fabric. The iron armchair by Gregorius Pineo is from Kneedler Fauchère; the white chairs and table by Rose Tarlow Melrose House. A Holly Hunt rug from Jennifer West grounds the room, and Donghia draperies frame the view.

From a design standpoint, the idea behind Alan and Jennifer Fournier’s Big Sky, Montana, vacation home set within the exclusive Yellowstone Club came with a bit of a twist. “It was a natural inclination to go for the traditional all-out rustic log vernacular that you usually see in the area,” says Alan. “But we wanted the visual effect to be more of a hybrid, chalet-style, with large connected spaces where our family and guests could gather together and be social.”

Expressing that concept took some creative thinking on the part of all involved. “The overall composition was driven by the views and conditions of the site, which offers ski-in/ski-out access,” says project architect and principal Joshua A. Barr, who worked on the architecture alongside lead designer and founding principal Larry Pearson. “Our goal was to take a classic log structure and add a contemporary edge.”

While materials are rooted in tradition, they were tweaked to add a more modern feel. The exterior is clad with beetle-kill wood siding, Harlowton moss rock and reclaimed barn wood, all either harvested or sourced locally in Montana. In certain sections of the home, such as the great room and dining room, ample windows are set inside lodgepole pine beams—many of which are wrapped around structural steel I-beams; this enabled the team to “express the structure with glass planes for a different experience that added depth and a layering of views,” Barr says.

Inside, a clear connection to the exterior was achieved by incorporating the same, or similar, materials in a more refined manner. Log walls and beamed ceiling structures, as well as locally quarried sandstone flooring, create contrast against plaster finishes, while reclaimed white oak was used for everything from flooring and wall paneling to cabinetry and door packages, and details like hand-hewn fireplace mantels. Most of the millwork was done by builder Chris Lohss and his crew, either on-site or at their log and timber yard outside of Bozeman. “It gave us more control,” he notes. “We had five semi loads of lodgepole pine and 30,000 board feet of white oak, and used everything but the sawdust. It was insane.”

Pulling it all together into a comfortable living space was the task of designer Rain Houser, who was involved from the start along with interiors assistant Skye Anderson. “Alan wanted a rustic, masculine look; Jennifer had more modern sensibilities and wanted things to be lighter and brighter, and have cleaner lines,” Houser says. “The design aesthetic became a combination of both styles.”

Working toward delivering a turnkey experience, Houser considered the owners’ requests in every detail, from architectural finishes to lighting to even bedroom slippers. Custom-designed furniture, which tended toward a more masculine style, was kept softer in tone in the home’s private areas. In communal spaces, including the great room, a sense of comfort was instilled with the addition of textural fabrics (alpaca, silk blends and supple leathers), accessories and rugs in light colors. Large, high-ceilinged rooms were brought down to a more livable scale by simple touches, such as creating cozy seating areas and lowering chandeliers.

Used year-round, the home easily accommodates the Fourniers and their four children, as well as a myriad of extended family members and clusters of guests. Après-ski (or golf, as the case may be), the generous spa—complete with a massage room, separate dry sauna and steam room—and a waterfall feature provide respite. In the forest nearby, a rustic-chic guest cabin pays homage to Montana’s earlier days.

After the two-year building process, the design team agrees that the involvement of the owners, particularly Alan, who even accompanied Houser from his home in New Jersey to design showrooms in New York at the beginning of the project, was critical to the home’s success. “Alan made it clear that he wanted an exceptional product, so we went the extra mile and pulled out all the tricks,” says Lohss. Barr notes that it might have been push-and-pull sometimes, “but when owners are aware and involved, they end up with something they love.”

—Linda Hayes

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