A Design Team Revives A 1930s Hillsborough Residence

Details

exterior landscape Hillsborough Residence

A 1931 Hillsborough home was revived with new interiors by designer David Todd Oldroyd. Outside, the front garden, originally designed by John Hays McLaren, was updated by landscape architect Brian Koch to include new low stone walls, cobble detailing and lavender. Many of the home's balconies were rebuilt by Ironstone Metal Works.

coastal entry foyer neutral view...

In the entry, Oldroyd set the home's aesthetic tone with a mix of furnishings, including a 1940s Swedish rug from Doris Leslie Blau in New York and an Ironies bench from Kneedler-Fauchere; the stool is by Maarten Baas.

oastal entry foyer antique lantern

Oldroyd left much of the entry in its original state, including the antique lantern hanging from the beamed ceiling. He then hung works from Ronnie Genotti's 99 Views of an Elephant series above a Formations console from Shears & Window. A Swedish rug rests on the original floor tiles.

coastal living room tufted sofa...

For the spacious living room, Oldroyd paired a tufted sofa with two A. Rudin chairs covered with a Joseph Noble velvet and a custom pen shell coffee table by C. Mariani Antiques, Restoration & Custom. The Atollo lamps are by Vico Magistretti for Oluce, and the artwork is by Roy Lichtenstein. Closer to the fireplace, sofas upholstered with a Scalamandre jacquard face a cluster of brushed stainless-steel tables from Propeller.

coastal kitchen pale blue cabinetry...

The designer brightened the kitchen by painting the ceiling white and the cabinetry a pale shade of blue. Rattan stools from the 1960s pull up to the stone countertop supplied and installed by Fox Marble, and a custom fixture fabricated by Dogfork Lamp Arts with Moroccan globes by Tazi Designs hangs above. The clients' chairs were reupholstered with a fabric by Mokum for the adjacent breakfast room.

dining room updated antique chandelier...

In the dining room, Oldroyd recovered the clients' existing chairs with a white textured textile by JAB Anstoetz Fabrics, and he gave the frames a new soft gray finish; the original antique chandelier was also given an update with linen shades. Fox Marble stripped and refurbished the tile floors, and Morgan's Fine Finishes refinished the original paneling.

coastal family room saltwater fish...

Saltwater fish tanks flank the family room's fireplace, above which hangs a work by Lisa Bartleson. Oldroyd grounded the room with a silk-and-wool rug by Tai Ping and paired A. Rudin chairs with a custom sectional upholstered with a Glant fabric. The custom white-oak-and-Corian coffee table was crafted by Julian Giuntoli Custom Furniture.

coastal bedroom green floral wallpaper...

Oldroyd wrapped the master bedroom walls with de Gournay's Earlham silk wallcovering in emerald green. Draperies made with a Rogers & Goffigon linen, along with a silk-and-wool Tai Ping rug, provide additional soothing texture. A walnut bed, upholstered with a Glant textile, by C. Mariani Antiques, Restoration & Custom faces a pair of 1940s Maurizio Tempestini chairs; a custom chaise upholstered with a JAB Anstoetz Fabrics velvet rounds out the space.

coastal white bathroom black and...

Mirrors in the master bath feature an eglomise pattern by Villafranca Studio; the 1940s Barovier & Toso Murano glass sconce is from Thomas Gallery in New York. Fox Marble supplied and installed the black-and-white floor tiles in a custom pattern by ODADA, and a Waterworks tub is set within a custom marble surround.

coastal dressing room powder room...

A 1930s Seguso chandelier from Fred Silberman in New York establishes a luxurious sensibility in the wife's dressing room, which features custom cabinetry designed by ODADA. Twin ottomans wear a custom velvet by Sabina Fay Braxton.

This is the house that every other house in the neighborhood was modeled after,” says designer David Todd Oldroyd of a pedigreed Hillsborough, California, residence originally designed by architect Willis Polk. “I was ecstatic about restoring it and bringing it into the next century.”

This required shoring up the foundation, repairing a leaky roof, opening up a belvedere enclosed in the 1990s and reconciling the split personality of a house where staff originally occupied one wing and homeowners another. Oldroyd addressed the latter by converting the servants’ quarters to a large family room, connected to the kitchen.

Appointing rooms with “a mix of pieces spoke to the dance we used throughout the house,” says Oldroyd. Furniture silhouettes are curvaceous in a 1930s way but contemporized by minimizing ornament and pattern, and riffing off a single color in rooms instead of employing complex palettes.

The owners–who share the home with their four young boys–hadn’t been seeking a historic property, but are now thrilled to be its stewards. “We really wanted to do the right thing, to bring it back to its original glory,” says the husband.

More from Luxe...