Start Spreading The News: A Space Can Be Both Edgy And Elegant, And This NYC Apartment Is Proof

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A Vladimir Kagan pedestal dining table and sculpted sling chairs from Holly Hunt provide a posh setting for dining. Studio Van den Akker’s dramatic round Jackson chandelier hangs overhead, while the artwork Words Tumble & Helpless Disorder by Betsy Kaufman adorns the wall.

A Vladimir Kagan pedestal dining table and sculpted sling chairs from Holly Hunt provide a posh setting for dining. Studio Van den Akker’s dramatic round Jackson chandelier hangs overhead, while the artwork Words Tumble & Helpless Disorder by Betsy Kaufman adorns the wall.

The living space radiates with a refined, artistic design that alludes to the innate energy of New York City.

The living space radiates with a refined, artistic design that alludes to the innate energy of New York City.

A minimalistic sanctuary for slumber, the master bedroom employs creamy hues and soft textures. The custom six-drawer dresser was designed by Timothy Brown Studio and the vintage Philip Arctander clam chair is upholstered in a Holland & Sherry boucle.

A minimalistic sanctuary for slumber, the master bedroom employs creamy hues and soft textures. The custom six-drawer dresser was designed by Timothy Brown Studio and the vintage Philip Arctander clam chair is upholstered in a Holland & Sherry boucle.

In a corner of the living room, a walnut and Corian bar—complemented by adjustable-height stools by Dune NY—does double duty as a breakfast nook and cocktail workstation. An assortment of vintage Roger Capron ceramics line the upper bar shelves and Serge Mouille’s Saturne sconce lights the scene.

In a corner of the living room, a walnut and Corian bar—complemented by adjustable-height stools by Dune NY—does double duty as a breakfast nook and cocktail workstation. An assortment of vintage Roger Capron ceramics line the upper bar shelves and Serge Mouille’s Saturne sconce lights the scene.

Designer Timothy Brown created a calm color scheme punctuated by purple for a couple’s apartment in the West Village, including an ALT for Living runner in the hallway. The art above the custom steel benches is an untitled work by James Nares, while Rachel Perry’s Lost in My Life (Fruit Stickers Standing with Round) hangs on the back wall.

Designer Timothy Brown created a calm color scheme punctuated by purple for a couple’s apartment in the West Village, including an ALT for Living runner in the hallway. The art above the custom steel benches is an untitled work by James Nares, while Rachel Perry’s Lost in My Life (Fruit Stickers Standing with Round) hangs on the back wall.

Sunlight streams into the spacious master bath, where a glazed ceramic India Mahdavi stool and Gaetano Pesce rug add subtle sophistication. Underground, a digital photograph by Tony Conway, perches on the windowsill.

Sunlight streams into the spacious master bath, where a glazed ceramic India Mahdavi stool and Gaetano Pesce rug add subtle sophistication. Underground, a digital photograph by Tony Conway, perches on the windowsill.

The wife’s office—which doubles as her meditation room—is enveloped by pink grasscloth wall coverings and a hand-knotted silk rug from Sacco Carpet. The custom Avery Boardman sleeper sofa in a Holland & Sherry alpaca boucle pairs elegantly with the Jens Risom ottoman upholstered in a woven Donghia leather.

The wife’s office—which doubles as her meditation room—is enveloped by pink grasscloth wall coverings and a hand-knotted silk rug from Sacco Carpet. The custom Avery Boardman sleeper sofa in a Holland & Sherry alpaca boucle pairs elegantly with the Jens Risom ottoman upholstered in a woven Donghia leather.

In the husband’s office, a Phillip Jeffries Savile Suiting wall treatment from Holly Hunt complements the vintage Swedish chair upholstered in a navy blue Knoll Textiles velvet. The wool and cashmere drapes are Holland & Sherry and the sleeper sofa sports a Rogers & Goffigon linen.

In the husband’s office, a Phillip Jeffries Savile Suiting wall treatment from Holly Hunt complements the vintage Swedish chair upholstered in a navy blue Knoll Textiles velvet. The wool and cashmere drapes are Holland & Sherry and the sleeper sofa sports a Rogers & Goffigon linen.

To avoid the feeling of walking into a white box when entering the apartment, Brown opted for an antique mirror wallcovering from Bendheim that reflects natural light from the living room. He custom-designed the pink console cabinet, which sits next to a vintage Edra mummy chair. The table lamp and mirror are both from Wyeth.

To avoid the feeling of walking into a white box when entering the apartment, Brown opted for an antique mirror wallcovering from Bendheim that reflects natural light from the living room. He custom-designed the pink console cabinet, which sits next to a vintage Edra mummy chair. The table lamp and mirror are both from Wyeth.

Though much of the home adheres to a lighter, Zen-like palette, Brown built in moments of moody drama, too. The powder room features a custom-scaled Trove wallcovering depicting X-ray peonies, along with vintage French bubbled-glass wall sconces from 1stdibs.

Though much of the home adheres to a lighter, Zen-like palette, Brown built in moments of moody drama, too. The powder room features a custom-scaled Trove wallcovering depicting X-ray peonies, along with vintage French bubbled-glass wall sconces from 1stdibs.

A move to New York City often comes early in life with nothing but a suitcase in hand and a dream in heart. But for a couple who had lived most of their married life in rural New Jersey, the impetus arrived when their three grown children left the nest. “We were figuring out what we were going to do with the rest of our lives,” the wife recalls. Having lived briefly in New York City after graduating from college, she had long pined for a return to the West Village, and so, it seemed serendipitous when they came upon a gracious corner condo unit with 11-foot ceilings and a primo location.

The move came with a fresh start design-wise. After putting all the furnishings from their former home into storage, the couple hired designer Timothy Brown to devise a sleek, downtown ethos befitting of their new chapter. “They had a vision of how they wanted to live in a city apartment,” Brown notes. “We wanted to use rich wood tones and pops of color to build a playful yet sophisticated environment.” Adds the wife, “Our home in New Jersey was a mishmash of different design styles that all sort-of worked together. In New York, I wanted something with a little bit more style that was energetic and artistic.”

A sense of energy and distinct point of view are apparent immediately upon entering the apartment, thanks to Brown’s decision to panel the foyer in sheets of laminated, textured mirrored glass—a herculean task executed by builder Gareth McQuaid. Inwardly situated, the thoroughfare called for something dramatic yet practical. “It was all about how we could add a little more light and sparkle,” he explains. “It’s glamorous, but not too glamorous—and it makes the space feel so much bigger.”

It was the smoky undertones of the mirrored glass foyer that inspired the unexpected hits of purple, pink and blue which would lace the home together. To offset the traditionally feminine hues found in focal details like the aubergine drapes in the great room and magenta rugs in the hallway, the designer stuck to dark wood and upholstered pieces with strong, clean lines set against a sea of moody grays and textured whites. Venetian plaster, felt, and grasscloth treatments imbue the walls with visual depth while providing a neutral canvas for the couple’s compelling art additions—many of which are large-scale photographic works curated by art consultant Ann Yaffe Phillips—to take center stage.

Technically a three-bedroom apartment, the clients opted for a different configuration—one that would play to their daily routines as a household of two versus five. Alongside Brown, plans were made for an airy master bedroom flanked by posh his-and-hers offices, each outfitted with a sofa that pulls out to a comfortable bed when the children or friends pay them a visit.

Another decadent decision: the dining area-adjacent dry bar, which Brown fashioned around a cumbersome structural column. Filling the formerly dead nook, the walnut-topped Corian bar does double duty as a cocktail hub by evening and a casual breakfast spot by morning. “It’s so simple, but so perfect,” the wife shares. “I always marvel at how Timothy made something beautiful out of nothing.”

Since the wife was particularly attuned to the sensory experience of each living space, Brown had much of the furniture custom made. The bedside tables, for example, are within optimum reach of their raised smart mattress, and her office desk and chair allow for her to sit cross-legged in meditation. It was equally important that all textiles—from the rugs underfoot to the throw pillows on sofas—be exceptionally soft and tactile.

While indeed a fresh start for the couple, Brown is quick to clarify that the new city roost is a thorough reflection of their personalities. “She’ll wear a white t-shirt and leather jacket while arranging flowers,” Brown shares of the wife, likening her own “edgy sophistication” to the finished feel of the apartment itself. “It’s refined,” he adds of his handiwork, “but it’s fun, too.”