Fall In Love With One-Of-A-Kind Spaces In This Midcentury Dallas Home

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Outdoor fire pit with bench...

A curved wooden bench is paired with teak chairs create a comfortable outdoor seating area and a place to enjoy fires on cool nights.

Study featuring Steve McCurry photography...

A photograph by Steve McCurry overlooks the study’s sleek trestle desk by Richard Wrightman Design and a black leather tulip chair found on 1st Dibs, which top a flat-weave wool rug from Abrash. The Burled Co fabricated the shelving.

Living room featuring a Lee...

A Lee Broom Hanging Hoop chair from Scott + Cooner appears in the living room near a Joshua Hagler painting from Cris Worley Fine Arts. De La Espada lounge chairs from Hammer and Spear overlook a Lob Low table by Christophe Delcourt for Collection Particulière from The Future Perfect. The Carol Piper Rugs floor covering is from Allan Knight.

Dining room featuring a custom...

A David Yarrow photo overlooks a custom dining room table with a top from Aria Stone Gallery and Tribute Modern dining chairs from Craft Associates, Inc. A John Pomp Studios chandelier hangs above, and the rug is from Abrash. Louis Gloria Painting coated the walls Benjamin Moore White Dove at 200 percent.

Kelli Vance painting overlooking a...

Tables built into a custom bench by Neovations combine form and function in the game room below a Kelli Vance painting from Cris Worley Fine Arts. Draperies feature the Trocadero print from the Thomas Callaway Pattern Works collection for Holland & Sherry.

Kitchen with black cabinetry.

Douglas Cabinetry fabricated the kitchen cabinets painted Sherwin-Williams Tricorn Black by Louis Gloria Painting, which blend with the island countertop by Sarché Concrete Design. Ann Sacks Savoy bronze backsplash tiles, an Apparatus pendant from Allan Knight and Nichols stools by Marmol Radziner for McGuire complete the space.

Bar area with a Canal...

In the breakfast area, artwork by Katrine Hildebrandt from Gut Gallery apposes draperies featuring linen from the Thomas Callaway Pattern Works collection for Holland & Sherry. The Canal dining table by Patricia Urquiola for Riva 1920 is from Scott + Cooner.

Great room featuring a bar.

Custom swivel chairs mix with an existing sofa and a floor covering from Carol Piper Rugs in the great room. Elitis wallpaper from George Cameron Nash joins shelving fabricated by Neovations in the bar area featuring Apparatus lighting from Allan Knight and a Gregg Coker painting from Craighead Green Gallery.

Bedroom with neutral tones and...

A Linea chandelier from Stahl + Band lights the main bedroom, where Lawson-Fenning lamps flank a bed showcasing Sandra Jordan alpaca. A side table from Laura Lee Clark mixes with armchairs from Stahl + Band and an ottoman wearing Holland & Sherry boucle and StudioArt Taipan suede leather from Donghia, respectively. The rug is from Farzin Rugs.

Bathroom featuring dark green walls...

The main bathroom’s custom walnut cabinetry by Carlos Guerrero Studio with stone from Aria Stone Gallery tops flooring from Ann Sacks’ Liaison by Kelly Wearstler Mosaics collection. Accents include The Urban Electric Co. sconces, a Kara Mann chair from Baker and a David Bates painting from Arthur Roger Gallery.

Outdoor seating area with Janus...

A covered porch with easy access from the house promotes an indoor-outdoor flow. Here, the modular sofa encourages lounging and pairs with a driftwood ottoman. Both are by Janus et Cie.

Outdoor dining table and chairs.

Beautiful surroundings invite outdoor dining, and a table and chairs by Janus et Cie create the perfect spot for enjoying an intimate al fresco meal.

Designer Tracy Hardenburg’s pulse quickened the first time she pulled up to this midcentury modern-style Dallas residence. “I walked in and thought, ‘Wow, this place is baseline beautiful,’” she remembers. “And I immediately visualized doing so many exciting things.” Luckily for her, the homeowner—an attorney with two grown children—found her enthusiasm contagious. “Rather than wanting to incorporate her own style, she said, ‘Let’s do what you want to do,’” he recalls. And so, with a shared passion for the architecture and its big windows, high ceilings and spacious feel, the duo set out to create a casual yet elegant environment reflecting the client’s more playful side.

True to form, the owner was all in when Hardenburg suggested suspending hanging hoop chairs from the 30-foot-living room ceiling as part of the seating arrangement. And on the practical side, he easily acquiesced when she proposed expanding the initial plans for a kitchen and main bathroom redo to encompass three more bathrooms and two guest rooms. However, the designer’s vision for a moody, dark cooking space with black cabinets and a bronze tile backsplash was a tougher sell. “I said to him, ‘You have 11-foot ceilings and lots of natural light—we can do this,’ ” she explains, and it was a leap of faith the homeowner is glad he took. “Now it’s one of my favorite spaces,” he notes, crediting builder Blake Evenson, working with project manager Charlie Williamson, for flawlessly executing many of the kitchen’s details.

Back in the living room, where the hanging chairs checked the fun box, a gently curving velvet sofa introduced a refined touch to the voluminous space enhanced by views of the surrounding landscape brought to life by Verdant Grounds. A fan of natural elements, Hardenburg also brought in sculpted cane-and-walnut chairs. “I love rough materials but beautiful shapes,” says the designer, who completed the room with an organic limestone-and-wood coffee table. That same strategy served Hardenburg well in the more formal of the two dining spaces, where a David Yarrow photograph spans one wall and a glass-and-metal John Pomp chandelier floats above a table with a gray stone top and a steel base. About the latter, the designer says, “It’s a cold element but striking, and I softened it with the chairs and a walnut console with navy blue leather on the doors.”

Just two steps up from the formal dining room, upholstered seating and a wooden table speak to the more relaxed nature of the breakfast area. Here, a central compartment cutting through the center of the table multitasks as a place for centerpiece plants or cold drinks, with a series of wood pedestals aiding in serving snacks. Such choices exemplify the designer’s quest for the unusual and her stated desire that everything from the art to the furnishings be cool and unique. “I never want someone to walk into a home I’ve worked on and think, ‘Tracy did that,’ ” she says. 

Despite the midcentury modern-style backdrop, Hardenburg’s furniture selections reflect this desire to create one-of-a-kind spaces rather than simply match the architecture. Regarding a pair of upholstered chairs in the great room, the designer explains, “I didn’t place them there because they are midcentury in style—I liked that they swiveled and had pretty wooden bases.” The addition of both a coffee table with an open square design and a textured area rug defined by primitive shapes further punctuates her ability to bring uniqueness to an interior. “I have no formula,” she notes. “My goal as a designer is simply for nobody else to have the same thing.”

In no space is that objective more apparent than the main bathroom, where a painting by Dallas artist David Bates proved the impetus for decidedly masculine dark green walls. “I thought that with a man as my client, I had a shot at using that color,” says Hardenburg, who accommodated the homeowner further by replacing a bathtub with a floating leather banquette where he can take off his shoes or watch television. She also ringed a section of the room with walnut vanities capped with white marble while topping off everything with a dazzling dark green-and-white marble floor. “I don’t normally do a lot of pattern but the marble is stunning and I still look at that space and gasp,” Hardenburg adds. “Like the rest of the house, this room has everything—color, elegance and it’s fun. 

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