Embrace Emerald Hues In This Denver Tudor-Style Home

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Living room with green walls,...

Awash in green hues, designer Emily Tucker created a rich yet moody atmosphere in the living room of this Denver home. A custom sofa upholstered in Jiun Ho’s Kusku fabric offers a comfortable landing spot, as does a custom window seat dressed in a Pierre Frey striped velvet. The marble coffee table is CB2 and the artwork is a cherished piece of the clients.

Living room with green walls...

The formal living room feels like a cocktail lounge with walls washed in Benjamin Moore’s Dollar Bill Green and a custom Nepalese rug that create a moody atmosphere. Seating includes vintage walnut chairs and a neoclassical brass tabouret, all from 1stdibs. The marble coffee table is CB2.

dining room with long rectangular...

An Apparatus chandelier hangs above the dining room’s Design Within Reach table and Møller Model 77 chairs, with a vintage Persian Heriz rug underfoot. The Rug Company’s Climbing Leopard runner makes a statement while Amy Ellingson art hangs on the wall.

breakfast nook lined by windows,...

The bright breakfast nook features a banquette with a cushion wrapped in Kravet vinyl, Knoll’s Saarinen dining table with an Arabescato marble top and Eames DSR Eiffel chairs. The Urban Electric Co.’s Dome pendant illuminates the tableau.

kitchen with oak cabinets, green...

Beveled-edge Shaker cabinets in cerused oak flank the kitchen’s BlueStar range and hood. The backsplash in Artistic Tile’s Doge Fete Multi Blend Mosaic from Decorative Materials adds colorful contrast.

Family room with mantle and...

Farrow & Ball’s Inchyra Blue coats the family room’s mantel and built-in cabinetry. It nods to the Anthropologie chaise wearing a Peter Dunham Textiles fabric. The sofa, ottoman and rug are bespoke designs. Atop the fireplace is art is by Sarah Kinn.

Bedroom with green wallcovering, four...

In the daughter’s room, Phillip Jeffries’ Manila Hemp wallpaper sets a soothing tone. A Maiden Home bed rests atop Stark’s Missoni Piaggio rug. The dresser is from Noir and the chair is Room & Board. A Lee Jofa fabric dresses the windows.

bathroom with floral wallcovering and...

The Mural Source’s Enchanted Garden chinoiserie mural adorns the powder room. A brass Cylinder Double Sconce from Schoolhouse tops Made Goods’ Dianna Mirror. The window treatments are crafted from a Dedar textile.

bathroom with skylights, white oak...

The primary bathroom’s dynamic architecture is supported by white oak cabinetry and Waterworks’ Keystone Statuary Marble bordering the same brand’s MasterPiece Shaker Weave Petite Statuary Marble Mosaic on the floor. The sink and tub fixtures are also Waterworks.

Office with wooden desk, green...

Design Within Reach’s Edel table joins a Herman Miller chair in the wife’s office. A midcentury armchair from 1stdibs reupholstered in a Nobilis velour is poised nearby. The rug is from Surya and the overhead lighting fixture is from Visual Comfort & Co.

It was supposed to just be a zhush. Or, at least, that’s the word the clients of interior designer Emily Tucker used when they invited her over to see their newly purchased Tudor-style home in Denver’s Hilltop neighborhood. She had previously worked on their Vail dwelling and they told her, “We’d like to do a few small things to our Denver property now that the Vail house feels so put together—you know, let’s zhush it up.” But as they all walked and talked through the residence together, it was immediately clear that this was going to be a bigger project. Her clients asked for a gut renovation of the kitchen and all the bathrooms, an overhaul of the basement, family room and all the bedrooms, with a furnishing update to boot. “This wasn’t a zhush at all; we were redoing the entire house,” Tucker remembers with a laugh. 

In fact, the work that they discussed was so extensive, it required the clients to place their belongings in storage and relocate for the 10 months that it took Tucker and general contractor Tim Coughran to complete the renovation. “We took everything down to the studs, though we stayed within the footprint of the original home and didn’t do major structural changes,” Coughran explains, adding that his team touched or updated nearly every system, surface and finish. 

“They wanted the house to feel fresh and modern, full of the richness the wife remembered from growing up on the East Coast,” Tucker shares. “Because this was our second project together, I had a good understanding of how they wanted the spaces to feel and function.” The homeowners envisioned traditional furnishings with a modern edge and a palette that pulled in saturated jewel tones paired with interesting materials. “This is their primary residence, so they wanted it to be a little more elevated,” the designer adds. 

Tucker’s floor-to-ceiling revamp of the kitchen is a perfect example of the process she undertook throughout the house. While the room’s layout remained the same, its components received a significant stylish upgrade. Witness the white oak cabinets: Beveled-edge Shaker panels and a cerused finish that highlights the wood’s grain take them from expected to quietly extraordinary. “That’s very much my design ethos: traditional, but made modern for the way we live today,” Tucker says. It’s a spirit confirmed by the animated pattern of the mosaic backsplash and what the designer dubs “that old-school, rich forest green” of the range and its coordinating hood. “The backsplash has some really beautiful green marble in it and the veining on the quartzite countertop is green too,” she points out. “Putting it all together felt traditional, but also fun and inspiring.”

Verdant hues skate throughout the house. They color the sofa, millwork and fireplace surround in the family room; they wrap the cushions in the dining room and envelop the walls and carpet in the formal living room; they tint the moldings upstairs. This was a conscious choice, drawn from an emerald-colored room the wife had shown Tucker early on as inspiration. Placed widely and strategically, the shade becomes a neutral backdrop for the home’s more playful moments, including a red runner with a white leopard that appears to climb the stairs, a glass chandelier inspired by clouds hovering over the dining room table, and vibrant art and patterned tile scattered throughout. “We wanted to make the interiors feel young and fresh, just like the people that live here,” the designer comments. “They’re interesting and cool, so the pieces in their home should reflect that.” And, Tucker adds, in spaces that already had so much historical integrity—she nods to the dining room’s original built-ins—she mixed classic and contemporary choices, first selecting a very traditional vintage Persian rug to “ground the room in history, while a modern table, chairs and light fixture bring it right back to the present day.”

Most of the home’s furniture is bespoke, which “really makes the house feel tailored,” the designer continues. “We honed in on what was perfect for the home and gave the clients something unique and special.” In other words, she achieved just the sort of zhush this couple was hoping for—and much more.