With Lush Sight Lines Galore, This Florida Home Champions Nature

Details

white bermuda-style house with a...

“The white concrete roof was chosen to be reminiscent of Bermuda’s butteries and courtyards,” designer Christie Cade shares of this stucco Village of Golf abode painted Benjamin Moore Atrium White. A procession of palms and terra-cotta urns holding elephant ears and blueberry bushes flank a walkway leading to a SunCoast Iron Doors entrance from Portal Elegance.

entryway with white walls, table,...

Light and airy defines the entryway, which features an antique Chinese armoire, a rattan McGuire butterfly chair and a vintage table with an iron base and a limestone top on shellstone flooring. On the walls, also painted Atrium White, hang a plaster Visual Comfort & Co. sconce and a duo of artworks by Tara Donovan.

path lined with palm trees...

Leading off the patio, a path lined with Sylvester palms and terra- cotta planters containing elephant ears draws the eye to the shellstone pool and the pool house, home to a Four Hands table and Sutherland chairs. Landscape architect Chris Vance designed the grounds, which were installed by Steve Kross.

airy great room with large...

Steel-framed windows by SunCoast Iron Doors from Portal Elegance steal the show in the great room, enveloped in Benjamin Moore’s Atrium White and a sisal Merida rug. A midcentury French table rests beneath a Formations chandelier. By the kitchen, chairs in Holly Hunt’s Great Plains linen surround a Robert Kuo table.

living area with white cathedral...

At the far end of the great room, custom sofas in the same Holly Hunt linen, John Himmel chairs and antique horseshoe-back chairs with Rose Tarlow Melrose House fabric cushions encircle a J. Robert Scott coffee table. The built-ins by Pacillo’s Custom Furniture frame a Scott Kerr painting on a lift, which lowers to reveal an 84-inch flat-screen.

kitchen with cerused-oak cabinetry, wicker...

Cade trimmed the kitchen’s cerused-oak cupboards by Pacillo’s Custom Furniture in Belgian bluestone. Lit by Urban Electric Co. pendants and joined by Palecek stools, the island is a preferred perch for casual meals. Waterworks’ Grove Brickworks backsplash and Bridge faucet punctuate the space. The Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances are from Ferguson.

mudroom with japanese tansu chest

Viewed from the kitchen, the minimalist mudroom hosts a prolific Japanese Tansu chest in lieu of traditional closets. The runner is a Libeco flat weave, and the wire-and-rice-paper lanterns were purchased from Paula Roemer Antiques.

primary bedroom with white walls,...

The main bedroom introduces shades of blue with silk pillows on a Verellen bed beneath an unknown midcentury artwork, tying to the Liaigre lounge set from Holly Hunt. The vintage plaster nightstands hold Visual Comfort & Co. lamps. Coraggio linen sheers option privacy, and a sisal Merida carpet grounds the space.

guest bedroom with twin rattan...

Designed around Red Amaryllis 1 by Sarah Graham, the guest room charms with a restored raffia twin bed, one of a pair from Paula Roemer Antiques upholstered in Perennials fabric. The brass Visual Comfort & Co. lamp rests on an iron Bernhardt table. A linen Coraggio Roman shade, an antique gilt chair nabbed at High Point and a sisal Merida rug are the finishing touches.

main bathroom with white walls,...

Cade’s motto of consistency in materials is on full display in the main bathroom, which features the same cabinetry, shellstone paving and Belgian bluestone counters as the kitchen. A Visual Comfort & Co. sconce is affixed to a custom mirror. The Mirabelle tub and Kallista sink are from Ferguson.

Ringed by Banyan trees and birdsong, the private enclave of Village of Golf unspools like a bolt of green velvet. Tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac in this South Florida town stands a house of a peaceful nature. With its stucco façade and allée of welcoming palms, it plays well with its neighbors. But a closer look reveals curiosities: a modern-inflected Cape Dutch silhouette, a monolithic white roof and soaring steel-framed windows affording views straight through its heart to the backyard beyond. “UPS calls it the glass house,” says designer Christie Cade. “People think it’s an atrium.”

Clarity—of vision and of physical sight lines—is exactly what Cade intended when she teamed up with architect Rustem Kupi on designs for the new-build residence. The owners, Floridians via Northern California, wanted a cohesive indoor-outdoor dialogue, the informality of single-story living and a warm, modern ethos. A modified H-shape Cape Dutch layout would strike that perfect balance of East and West Coast tradition, comfort and contemporary appeal.

To bring in the outside in a heroic way, Cade made the decision early on to fabricate steel-framed impact windows, a local rarity. In addition to making a bold statement, “you can create larger expanses, because steel is stronger than standard aluminum,” she explains. “It allows so much light in.” In total, the great room features six 11-foot-tall openings framing verdant views. She also employed the same shellstone flooring indoors and outdoors to establish a focal alfresco connection.

Consistency in materials is a signature move of the designer, and for this home, she didn’t stop at flooring. The kitchen’s matte-finish cerused-oak cabinetry, unlacquered brass fittings and Belgian bluestone counters extend to the bathrooms. The same sisal rugs occupy every room. And while common room windows are left bare to best enjoy the views, the bedroom and bathroom windows wear the same sheer linen fabric.

Cade also relied on scale and symmetry for sparkle—especially in the great room. There, general contractor Alexander L. King aligned every last air-conditioning duct and light fixture between the ceiling beams, creating a visceral sense of peace and order. “If you stand in that room looking south, everything centers: the windows, the cabinetry, everything,” he says. “It’s a beautiful, crisp, clean look.” A pair of deep kitchen islands, a gracious library table that doubles for dining and the living area’s enormous Scott Kerr painting turn a would- be cavern into a cozy cathedral.

To drive home her “California Casual” interiors concept, Cade riffed off the cool steel windows with a rich cocktail of organic textures. “I’m all for texture wherever you can get it,” she says. “If you’re designing contemporary and you’re not using color or print, texture is what makes it happen.” Rattan and raffia accents, such as the kitchen stools and living area’s easy chairs, add hits of texture that feel right at home amidst the tropical environs, while touches of plaster and patina-prone metals hint at West Coast cool. Notably, the designer also limited built-ins throughout, favoring Japanese Tansu chests instead. Amid the predominately off-white, camel-and-black palette, surprises abound: A peak inside the kitchen pantry reveals a jolt of red lacquer, an oversize artwork of an amaryllis holds court between twin beds in the guest bedroom and, in the serene blue-toned main bedroom, a set of plastered rattan nightstands sport drawer pulls of little brass feet. “I always say I could be a minimalist, but there are too many great things in the world,” Cade muses.

Finish line in sight, the designer called upon landscape architect Chris Vance to lend his own similarly tailored aesthetic to the exteriors. Taking cues from Kupi’s structure, Vance imagined a central axis of palm trees joined by oversize planters teaming with elephant ears, bromeliads and Japanese blueberry trees. “It’s not about putting on a big show; it’s about feeling comfortable,” he says. “The trick to doing that is: Elements need to be bold and powerful, to become architectural features.” In another transformative stroke, he flipped the proposed pool siting on the horizontal. “I wanted to treat it like an old- school estate and make the pool a destination,” he explains. The grounds echo the alluring ease of the home’s interior, projecting Cade’s fondness for cohesion inside and out. “Consistency soothes the eye,” she shares. “It suits the pattern of nature and keeps things understated.”

More from Luxe...